Arlington Pet Hospital, PLLC 
and
East Memphis Pet Hospital

          

  

     

   Dr. Davis, Dr. Bean Allen, Dr. Laros-Beard, Dr. Hezel, Dr. Rahm & Dr. Haugh

 Arlington (901) 317-4412    East Memphis (901) 317-4414

              

Home : Pet Health Center : Pet Health Conditions : D-E-F : FELINE UROLOGIC SYNDROME : 

FELINE UROLOGIC SYNDROME

Feline Urologic Syndrome is a very frustrating condition to the veterinarian, client, and the cat.

It is of the most serious and distressing cat diseases confronting cat owners and veterinarians. FUS occurs in all breeds and ages, male and female, neutered and non-neutered, indoor and outdoor cats, and in those fed all type foods.

Feline urinary problems are currently the subject of much research, but the exact cause is still unknown and considered very complex. Possible causes may include heredity, diet, infections, and stress.

Early Signs of Trouble Include:

  • Irritability and restlessness
  • Bloody urine
  • Frequent trips to the litter box
  • Straining while in a squatting position
  • Urinating in unaccustomed places about the house

Cats with more advanced FUS may vomit or drool, cry with pain, strain constantly, or have a tender abdomen. These later signs often mean that the cat cannot pass urine because of sand stones or mucus plugs in the urinary passages plugging the urethra so urine cannot be expelled. If a veterinarian does not relieve obstruction promptly, the cat will die!

FUS can be an EMERGENCY situation if complete blockage has occurred. Prompt treatment is essential for survival! Treatment is directed at removing the obstruction, preventing infection, and maintaining the normal body fluid balance. With early treatment, most FUS cases respond well; however, recurrence within a few hours to a few months is common, and some patients die from the disease complications. In recurring cases, surgery may be recommended to enlarge the urinary opening to prevent the BLOCKAGE.

HOME CARE:

MEDICATIONS:

  • Antibiotics as directed for the infection.
  • Use a MINIMUM of 3 WEEKS!
  • Antispasmodics as directed for spasms and straining.
  • Drugs to encourage water consumption, increase urine volume, and stimulate bladder function.


DIET: (Most IMPORTANT to prevent RECURRENCE!)

  • After 60 days, feed nothing but Prescription Diet to prevent recurrence.
  • Clean, FRESH drinking water (change daily).
  • Feed NOTHING BUT Feline Prescription Diet for 60 days. (Two months.)

ACTIVITY: Encourage exercise.

MANAGEMENT:

  • Do NOT leave your cat unattended for extended times, indoors or out (days).
  • If you must board your cat, be sure to inform the attendant to watch for danger signs.
  • Check litter pan daily for signs of urination and abnormal urine.


NOTIFY THE CLINIC IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ARE OBSERVED:

  • Straining to urinate.
  • Crying when urinates.
  • Urinating in areas other than normal for your cat.
  • Frequent trips to litter box.
  • Vomiting.
  • Refusal to eat.
  • Bloody urine.
  • Depression.
  • Any other abnormality for your cat.

Proper diet and urinary acidifiers will successfully manage most cases. Recurrences usually are the result of failure to properly regulate the diet or failure to give medications as directed. In practically EVERY case of recurrence we see, the owner has switched off Prescription Diet!

When recurrences do occur, surgery may be recommended to enlarge the urethral opening. This will usually prevent urinary obstruction BUT does NOT prevent recurrent cystitis (bladder infection). Once a bladder infection has occurred, it often will return later in life, just as in humans.

PROPER DIET IS THE KEY TO PREVENTING RECURRENCE!




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